How do I view previously typed commands in the csh ?
10/01/2019 14:54
If I'm logged in under csh, how do I view the last, say, 10 to 50 commands that I've typed in the shell? Also, if I'm logged in as root, how do I view the last 10 to 50 commands that I've typed in the shell? Thanks.


Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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10/01/2019 14:54 - Hi, ThanksButNo wrote: bash is for sure the way to go especially if you use NIS in a mixed environment where both Solaris and Linux is since Linux use ONLY bash! /michael

Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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10/01/2019 14:54 - On Fri, 12 Jun 2009, Richard B. Gilbert wrote: True and I agree. But the nature of the question suggested to me that Michelle was a new user, not weddded to any particular shell. In this instance I was suggesting that there are better shells for a newbie to learn. Old csh hands are of course welcome to use their shell of choice, but they're also not likely to ask newbie questions that a glimpse of the man page could've answered.

-- Rich Teer, SCSA, SCNA, SCSECA URLs: http://www.rite-group.com/rich http://www.linkedin.com/in/richteer

Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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10/01/2019 14:54 - On Jun 13, 8:37 am, Rich Teer <rich.t...@rite-group.com> wrote: Ah -- taking this opportunity to proselytize, eh? :-) I'm starting to like bash. It is another Bourne Shell derivative with a more PC-like history mechanism, and appears to be the default shell on all the Linux boxen.

As I get to know it better, I have fewer things to remember between Linux and Solaris.

Even better, I've just discovered you can configure it to use either vi-like command editing like ksh. So with some minor tweaking, I have even fewer things to remember.

(By things to remember, I mean stuff like little things that are different -- like jumping back and forth between Delphi (Pascal-based) and Java (C-based), where in one you have apostrophe string quotes ('), colon-equal assignment (:=), and single-equal comparison (=), but in the other you have double-quotes (), single-equal (=) and double (==).

It's very annoying when you repeatedly use the wrong one!) :-n

Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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10/01/2019 14:54 - On Fri, 12 Jun 2009, Michelle wrote: Use the history command, provided history has been set up. But why are you using csh? There are several other, better choices (e.g., ksh).

Depends what shell.

-- Rich Teer, SCSA, SCNA, SCSECA URLs: http://www.rite-group.com/rich http://www.linkedin.com/in/richteer

Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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10/01/2019 14:54 - Rich Teer wrote: I think that the choice of shell is a religious issue! They all seem to get the job done somehow or other. What little training I got featured the Korn shell so ksh is what I use by preference. The Bourne shell is used for things like startup and shutdown on most systems. I think it best to leave it that way. YMMV What users choose to use as a shell is entirely up to them. If they're not using sh or ksh I can't help them much.


Source is Usenet: comp.unix.solaris
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