Multiple instances of MySQL server, datadir, and ibdata1
09/10/2018 11:47
Hello folks I need to run multiple instances of MySQL 5.1 server (run as service, database type is InnoDB) on the same windows computer (Windows Server 2008). I have been using this resource: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/mysql-config-wizard-cmdline.html I still have a couple of things I do not understand: 1. Whats the deal with ibdata1 file? Is this all right if it is shared by all the instances? Or shall I point to a separate file for each instance in the corresponding ini file? For example sharing the datadir folder between instances is said to be a bad idea.

2. To be able to have multiple instances of the service I intend to run bat scripts (containing different values for port, service name, ini file name, etc) to configure each instance.

Among other things I create a separate ini file for each instance. The challenge is to find an argument for MySQLInstanceConfig.exe that will set the datadir path in the ini file. It cannot be the case that one has to edit each ini file manually after MySQLInstanceConfig.exe has created them, can it? Thanks in advance for any help, Anatoly

Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - In article <4b3eb473-563e-41b6-a03b-e9162f4f6395@f13g2000vbv.googlegroups.com>, OK, I would start by studying and setting the appropriate variables ofa single MySQL instance, and only trying multiple instances if you needto do so. After all, if you have several instances on the same machine,you need the clients to know which one to connect to, and will have tohave all but one of them listening on a non-standard port.

The following page gives information on running multiple instances: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/multiple-servers.html Since each instance must have a separate data directory, they will eachhave their own ibdata1 file which will not be shared. You can't makemultiple instances share databases or tables; they will each have theirown completely separate set.

If the different groups of clients need to access the same tables,then multiple SQL instances is not the way to go. Instead, study howto scale a single instance appropriately.

CheersTony

Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - In article <4b3eb473-563e-41b6-a03b-e9162f4f6395@f13g2000vbv.googlegroups.com>, anatoly <anatoly71@gmail.com> wrote: OK, I would start by studying and setting the appropriate variables of a single MySQL instance, and only trying multiple instances if you need to do so. After all, if you have several instances on the same machine, you need the clients to know which one to connect to, and will have to have all but one of them listening on a non-standard port.

The following page gives information on running multiple instances: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/multiple-servers.html Since each instance must have a separate data directory, they will each have their own ibdata1 file which will not be shared. You cant make multiple instances share databases or tables; they will each have their own completely separate set.

If the different groups of clients need to access the same tables, then multiple SQL instances is not the way to go. Instead, study how to scale a single instance appropriately.

Cheers Tony -- Tony Mountifield Work: tony@softins.co.uk - http://www.softins.co.uk Play: tony@mountifield.org - http://tony.mountifield.org

Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - Hello Tony Well, the amount of clients is expected to be so hight that someresources might be exhausted. In particular number of connections(amount of concurrent sessions) might be over 2000. It seems safer tohave the option of having 2 or 3 instances of MySql server and lettingdifferent groups of client programs use different service instances.


Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - In article <d75e21c9-8a49-4a79-aee5-9f832792164a@g1g2000vbd.googlegroups.com>, Why do you believe you need to run multiple instances? What problem areyou trying to solve, for which you think that is the solution? A single instance of the server can easily serve multiple databases tomultiple users.

CheersTony

Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - In article <d75e21c9-8a49-4a79-aee5-9f832792164a@g1g2000vbd.googlegroups.com>, anatoly <anatoly71@gmail.com> wrote: Why do you believe you need to run multiple instances? What problem are you trying to solve, for which you think that is the solution? A single instance of the server can easily serve multiple databases to multiple users.

Cheers Tony -- Tony Mountifield Work: tony@softins.co.uk - http://www.softins.co.uk Play: tony@mountifield.org - http://tony.mountifield.org

Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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Answer score: 5
09/10/2018 11:47 - On 7 Nov, 12:24, t...@mountifield.org (Tony Mountifield) wrote: Hello Tony Well, the amount of clients is expected to be so hight that some resources might be exhausted. In particular number of connections (amount of concurrent sessions) might be over 2000. It seems safer to have the option of having 2 or 3 instances of MySql server and letting different groups of client programs use different service instances.


Source is Usenet: comp.databases.mysql
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