Problem when deleting files
11/09/2017 15:30
hi all I have Mandiva 2007 on my laptop..

I have these partitions: ' / ' , ' var ' , ' usr ' , ' home ' and 'tmp ' I deleted some large files from a connected usb hard drive.

The files got deleted but the size of ' / ' partition increased bythe same amount.

and no more room in that partition !! Seems delete function is not working.

Please help solve this. Thanksgkn

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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Answer score: 5
11/09/2017 15:30 - On Mar 4, 2:04 pm, Big Yellow Hats Shell$locate /trashgave me several locations, among them/usr/share/apps/systemview/trash.desktophad the recent deletion as well as several others.

Got rid of them and the partitions have shrunk baeck to size.

I may have ended up with an unbootable setup sans the help.

Thanks a lot to you both.

glnarasi

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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11/09/2017 15:30 - Quoth James D. Beard : But if we believe the OP (and I'm not saying I do ;) /tmp is on it's ownpartition and it is / which is growing by comparable amounts.

So I would add to this investigation... a) Are there any files in /root/.local/share/Trash/files/ ? b) Have you tried to '(s)locate' (or if you've got time, 'find' the supposed deleted files?

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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11/09/2017 15:30 - Quoth Big Dumb Hats : Just discovered a knode formating whoopsie so to be clear and cautiousthe above should read / root / .local / share / Trash / files / but withno internal spaces.


Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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11/09/2017 15:30 - In a terminal window, run the command alias and look for anything that starts out rm I suspect you have the rm command aliased to something that just moves it to a temporary directory somewhere (maybe /tmp ) and the files removed are not actually removed until 1. you rebootand the tmp directory is automatically cleared, 2. a cron job cleans up removed files after they have aged sufficiently, or3. you manually remove them.

This two-step removal process (and the similar interactive removal process invoked when rm is aliased to rm -i ) is intended to help prevent inadvertent removal of files, which can be catastrophic if you do not have a recent backup.

Unlike Micro$loth's delete, the actual UNIX/Linux rm commandwill remove a file, not just put a special character in its name and then allow other programs to overwrite the contents. Recovering a file once actually removed requires a great amount of effort dedicated to reading disk sectors raw and determining what you need and how to fit it back together. Hence, the common default for the rm command provides a more forgiving action.

Cheers! jim b.


Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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Answer score: 5
11/09/2017 15:30 - Quoth glnarasi : So, you're using KDE-- that fact should have been mentioned in youroriginal post-- and you were sending items to the trash instead ofdeleting them. Now be a good lil' newbie and spend some time exploringthe configuration options available in kcontrol (the KDE Control Center orConfigure Your Desktop). :-) You'll find you have the ability to add delete to the context menu.

Extra credit, see: man rm man rmdir

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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